Get Looking!

Get Looking!

Lots of people have old computers in their loft and, if they are in good condition, there may be a buyer for them. Bank holiday’s are a great time to have a clear out so in this blog we are looking at some retro computing hardware and some of the most influential game consoles to have existed.

Commodore PET

Released in 1977, the Commodore PET was a top seller in the Canadian and US education markets and was the basis for all 8-bit Commodore systems.

These systems are currently going for £150-£400 depending on the specific model. Have a look on eBay for the latest prices.

We have one of these in our office and it takes two people to move it, so if you are planning on selling one, remember it weighs quite a bit!

 Commodore PET 2001

ZX Spectrum

Released in 1982 the ZX Spectrum is credited as the machine that launched the UK IT industry, even some of our staff still have them in their loft!

Although because of the popularity of them don’t expect to get lots of money for one. Working un-boxed ones are currently going for up to £50 but if you can find a boxed one in good to mint condition then they can go for over £150.

If you can find your old games, mint condition can go for over £100.

The ZX was so popular that over 100 new titles were released in 2012. There has also been a Bluetooth version successfully funded on Kickstarter for IOS, Android and Windows which lets you play Spectrum games via a replica keyboard.If you really want to feel nostalgic then you can also find ZX Spectrum emulators and even Java games online!

ZX Spectrum

Atari 2600

The Atari 2600 was released in 1977 and although it was slow to take off, by 1979 programmers had learned to push the hardware capabilities. In 1980 Atari licensed Space Invaders doubling the sales to over 2 million units.

Working systems currently go for over £60 and boxed versions with documentation and original games can go for over £150.

Because of its popularity Atari became a synonym for video games and is regarded by IGN as “the console that our entire industry is built upon.” As with most of the old gaming consoles you can find emulators and websites to play the games on.The Atari 2600 also has what is considered the rarest video game ever made, called Gamma Attack, there was only one cartridge made and is estimated to be worth between £12,000 and £30,000.

 Atari 2600

Commodore 64

Released in 1982 the Commodore 64 is listed as the highest-selling single computer model of all time by the Guinness book of world records.

Because of its popularity and mass production, they only sell for around £40 and games sell for between £10 and £100, depending on their rarity.

There was also a portable version called the Commodore SX64 and it was the first portable computer to have a colour screen, if you find a working one of these they can go for over £500.

 Commodore 64

NES

Originally released in Japan in 1983 and later in the US in 1985, it is regarded as the best-selling gaming console of its time. The NES helped the US video game industry after the video game crash of 1983, at the same time Nintendo also introduced a now-standard business model of licensing third-party developers which helped its popularity.

The NES currently sells for around £50 and the games can go for up to £100. The rarest game for this console was created for the Nintendo world championship, there were two versions of this, the first one had a grey cartridge and can go for around £4,000 and the second on had a gold cartridge and can be worth up to £17,000!

 NES

Conclusion

Only the rarest of computers and games can bring you a tidy profit, even more so if you are lucky enough to have it in a pristine box. If you find a retro computer, the best thing to do is to look at web sites like eBay and see how many are selling and for what price.

If you can’t find any online then it may be worth finding a collectors forum and enquiring there, you may also find a buyer on them!

However, the rule is “don’t throw your old computers and their games away”, they may be worth something!